All my old boats turned bellyaks.

HISTORY OF BELLYAK: EVOLUTION PART 2

***This is the second installment of the History of Bellyak. To catch up, read part 1 HERE.***

Second Evolution of the History of Bellyak: The Meat Locker

Flirting With Hypothermia

Neither wind nor rain nor freezing temps were going to keep me from paddling my creations. I had spent countless hours sanding, shaping and glassing my prototype bellyaks and even though the winter of 2011 was a cold one and I didn’t own a drysuit, I was not going to be stopped. Instead, I bought two of the cheapest wetsuits I could find and wore both at the same time, leaving me feeling like a fat kid dressed for a snowstorm, and just as happy. Numb legs, slightly disoriented after freezing myself, and hands that took a few hours to work right again were small side effects compared to the thrill of doing something no one had ever done before.

Dust, Everywhere

The process of turning a chunk of foam into a paddleable bellyak had the side effect of producing trash bags full of foam dust. It was everywhere…in my hair, on every piece of clothing I owned, and even inside my fiddle. The first bellyaks were built in my dads shop, in my yard, under a shade tree, or anywhere I could set up and build…I was a man possessed.  In January of 2011, my dad let me use a room in a warehouse that used to be an old meat locker. I was in business. Climate controlled for working with the foam and resin and no one to clean up for. Every Wednesday for a year I would work around the clock to have something to paddle for the weekend.

History: the meat locker where the bellyak prototypes were created.

The meat locker, complete with my foam man that I used for scale. We were good friends.

Kayaks, Halved

I had learned enough in my first round of prototyping to know what I needed to do different next time. How can I create a bellyak that is as forgiving as the Phat (creek boat) but with the performance of the Session (freestyle kayak)? I had halved my personal collection of kayaks and thus started looking for used boats, something with a wide planing hull and somewhere between seven and eight feet long.

All my old boats turned bellyaks

All my old boats turned bellyaks

Nipple to Knee

After a few complete failures, I learned that a consistent curve from nipple to knee, with knees slightly below hips, was the optimal ergonomic position for prone paddling. I also knew I wanted to work off a planing hull, since it was much easier to turn and carve with ‘front paw drive.’ I was focused on figuring out the human/kayak interface, as this was the key element for this style of paddling. For this round of R&D I wanted a similar feel to the Liquid Logic Session. I found a used Wave Sport EZ and quickly gutted it and cut it in half to make a mold.

History: the Wave Sport EZ bellyak mold

Three Versions: Blue, White, Sprout

The EZ bellyak paddled just like a freestyle kayak (defined edges, quick transitions) but didn’t have quite enough bow volume and was very tippy for anyone over 160 pounds. I built three versions of this bellyak, and learned a ton about ‘how’ to paddle; surfing, squirting, spinning were all discovered on this particular evolution of prone paddling.

Hey Man, I Want Your Kayak!

Perception 3D:

The original bellyak, a Perception 3D, was beyond destroyed for using as a mold. The wide planing hull of the 3D and the extra volume would give me a plug with plenty of volume to work with. Then, the bellyak gods answered! At the French Broad River Fest in 2011, there was a guy with a 3D on his car. I chased him down and talked him into trading it for my Liquid Logic Little Joe.

Old school Adam Masters on a bellyak prototype

Throwback Adam Masters on a bellyak prototype

History of the bellyak: Yellow prototype History of the bellyak: Red prototype

Red and yellow: both of these had extra stern volume and bow volume, which gave more stability, and kept the boat from diving as much as the lower volume EZ and Session. This model introduced many of my friends to bellyaking. It had the performance of the Session and EZ but the extra volume made it more forgiving for learning.

Too Long

New Wave Sleek:

This kayak belonged to a friend of mine and had a few features I wanted to experiment with: length for speed, and figuring out the proper body depth in the bellyak. I built two versions, one blue, one green:

Greeek: much more boat under body (4″ at hips). Very tippy because the high body position, and the extra length made it very fast. Would hold a line but not very easy to use, none of my friends could make it past the eddy line without falling off. I needed to take out foam underneath the hips to allow the paddler to be lower in the boat. Sometimes mistakes teach more than getting it right.

History of the bellyak: Green prototype

Bleeek: Lowered body area, handled much better, needed more rise for chest.

One of the key factors I was figuring out was the proper body depth in the boat. The ideal is when your hips are level with the surface of the water while floating in the bellyak. If your hips are higher than the surface of the water the boat becomes exponentially tippier (yes, that’s a word). This version also reinforced the idea that secondary stability would be key for prone paddling, thus the planing hull with defined secondary stability was a must.

Too Short

Liquid Logic Biscuit:

This tumpy little boat was super fun in a wave. I Called it the WTF. Zero hull speed, no glide, awesome in a hole or small wave, but not substantially better in any one category over the Big EZ for prone paddling. It did provide me with valuable insight into the length/width ratios I was figuring out. I had found out what was too short, which was a valuable insight.

The WTF bellyak prototype

Just Right!

Wave Sport Big EZ:

This version was the culmination of everything I’d learned so far. More bow volume let me create more of a ‘nipple to knee’ ratio. I got the body area very close to right. I had figured out the crucial elements of the body/boat interface, was figuring out how to do tricks on my knees, and was able to front surf like a champ. Surfing a two foot wave, with my head inches from the water, is a feeling that only a bellyak provides. The length/width, volume distribution and planing hull all added up to an awesome ride.

3 Versions

Purple bellyak prototype Surfing on an early bellyak

 

EJ, who lives behind the waterfall, was checking my boat out.

EJ, who lives behind the waterfall, was checking it out.

 

Sanding, shaping, glassing and paddling: this was how I spent the spring and summer of 2011. It was a crucial time where I developed the skills and techniques that form the basis of bellyaking. But, there was no way I could bring my hand shaped models to the masses, so it was time to put on big boy pants.

Coming up! History of Bellyak: Evolution Part 3. Big Boy Pants, Computers and Huge Ovens